Lauren Clark fine Art presents “Women’s Work”, with artists Joan Barber, Abby DuBow, and Karen Iglehart. There will be a reception for the Artists Saturday, July 24 from 5-7pm.

Barber is well known locally for her stunning portraits, usually, but certainly not always, depicting young women and children in their most pensive moments. On view will be three large paintings not seen in the Berkshires before. Besides with Lauren Clark Fine Art, and until the pandemic, Barber had representation on Canyon Road in Santa Fe. Her gallery there will be sorely missed.

DuBow, a mainstay of the gallery, is showing her latest works-mainly etchings-which are a departure from her usual monotypes and monoprints. These are predominantly small, intimate works. The kind of work you want to get up close and personal with.

New to the gallery is Pioneer Valley artist Karen Iglehart. Here is an artist who really spreads her creative wings. Though the gallery will not be showing her photographs, she is as well known as a photographer as she is a painter. And as a painter her style ranges from abstract landscape to thoroughly non-objective abstract works. The show will be showcasing her works on canvas though her landscape paintings will also available on paper.

“Women’s Work”, Reception for the Artists at Lauren Clark Fine Art, Saturday, July 24, 5-7pm.

Lauren Clark Fine Art, 684 Main Street, Gt Brrington, MA.  For more information please call the gallery at 413.528.0432.

Lauren Clark Fine Art presents a show of very new works on paper by Abby BuBow. The series, titled “Corona Diary”, is an autobiography of the recent months the artist, and we, have all endured. The work is not as dark as one might presume as it follows a trajectory from sunny spring days to a sudden, strange winter-like sense of cold and loneliness to signs of hope and renewal. 

DuBow, who is best known as an established printmaker, has stepped outside her milieu to create this stunning group of mixed media paintings. Sometimes looking out and sometimes looking inward, she has captured a mood suddenly familiar to us all.

There will be a reception for the artist Saturday, July 11 from 2 to 7pm under and around an open sided tent outside the gallery, with staggered viewing inside throughout the day.

A Statement from the Artist
Corona Diary – 2020

In cold, bleak March I found myself stranded in the Berkshires. The sun refused to shine and I was stuck inside and isolated from the rest of the world. I missed my children and grandchildren very much. Before long I ended up in my studio with an overwhelming desire to paint mud. My art has often been dominated by vibrant colors, but the opposite came about through the experience of quarantining.

Through my studio window I viewed the loneliness of a small isolated house. My studio window informed and defined my paintings, looking out and looking in. Rage against the virus transformed into written words, tangled branches, dying flowers, gray landscapes, snow in May, distant family and friends. Gradually signs of spring and hope began to emerge though sightings of bright yellow forsythia, gorgeous marsh marigolds, and clusters of singing birds.

The act of painting helped me to see and deal with my feelings and emotions from March through June reflecting the chill of mud season to the rebirth of spring. Making art allowed me to create a visual diary that reflected the inhospitable darkness and chill of March mud to the warmth and color of spring.

Even as covid continues, surrounding and alienating all of us, spring can’t be stopped and the promise of new life offers hope in the future.

As we know we are not really out of the woods yet, though this desire to dip a toe into uncharted waters is virtually irresistible. To this end, there will be a reception for the artist Saturday, July 11 from 2 to 7pm under and around an open sided tent outside the gallery, with staggered viewing inside throughout the day. There will be further opportunities to meet the artist at an acceptable “social distance” throughout the duration of the show, which runs from July 11-July 26.

Though it should be fine to just stop by, we are also scheduling appointments in order to reduce any risks associated with the COVID-19 virus. If you’d like to schedule an appointment to meet the artist, view the art or to design a framing project, give us a call or send us an email.

Lauren Clark Fine Art, 684 Main Street, Gt Barrington, MA 01230
413.528.0432 Lauren@LaurenClarkFineArt.com

Here’s a story by the artist-

I check the oil in my car all the time, like a ritual. And even though it is a ritual, I never remember to have a piece of cloth, or a paper towel to wipe the dip stick on. I look around the parking lot for a piece of paper on the ground. Today it was Clarance Washington’s spelling test. Clarance is in the sixth grade. His spelling is almost as bad as mine is. His whole personality was clearly reflected in his test paper. The sheet is covered with red corrections and yet he writes. “I love doing my homework.”

He has to make up a sentence using the word popcorn. He starts to write “I love buttery”, but he can’t figure out how to spell buttery, so he crosses it out. Then he can see that his teacher will see his misspelling, so he crosses it out again even harder.

I’m not making this up at all. The paper is right here on my table. I didn’t use it for the oil. It plunged me for a moment back into my own childhood. I labored over my homework and tried to make it perfect to no avail. Why, if I could have engraved my homework I would have, if I could have gilded it I would have done that also. Anything, anything I could think of to please them.

-Richard Britell 2020

Every so often Mr Britell returns to making a series such as this, of mathematical equations as art. As we know, math and art have occasionally crossed paths through the ages, think da Vinci, Dürer, Escher. This artist’s seemingly ordinary take on this confluence feels ancient yet contemporary, beautiful but not, with titles and equations such as “The Square Root of 2”, “37 to 54 (the difficult years)” and “88 + 1 = 89”. These new works comprise a dozen or so small, brilliant, sgraffito paintings on canvas.

Richard Britell, career painter, studied at Pratt Institute with Philip Pearlstein and Walter Erlebacher. His first show in NYC at Staempfli Gallery was sold out, and reviewed in the New York Times. The artist currently lives in Pittsfield, MA.

Lauren Clark Fine Art is located at 684 Main Street Great Barrington, MA. Business hours are Thursday through Monday from 11:00 until 5:00 and Sunday from Noon until 4:00. For more information call 413.528.0432

We all do it, you know. Holiday time rolls around and those of us in the art business hope once again that people will consider the gift of art for their loved ones. And why not? No moving parts. No planned obsolescence. No expiration date.

There’s an intimacy in these small paintings, drawings, sculptures and prints you wont see in their larger forms. And there’s always room for them!

So come on in, tuck one under your arm, and prepare to present delight and joy in the form of art this year.

Jo Barry

Jo Barry was born in Kent where she studied art at Ravensbourne College of Art and Design. After teaching for a few years at Byam Shaw School of Art, she gave up teaching in 1981 to concentrate full time on her own work. Jo’s talents led her to etching as her principal means of artistic expression, although she also is proficient and talented at watercolors and pencil drawings.

Jo enjoys a considerable reputation in the art world and now ranks as
one of the finest living etchers. Her skill led her to election as a
Fellow of the Royal Society of Painter Printmakers.  Her studio is at
her home in the New Forest, Ringwood, where she lives with her husband
and son as well as five cocker spaniels, sheep, chickens, ducks, and
countless doves. Her environment provides Jo with a great deal of the
inspiration for her work, which depicts nature and her beloved English
countryside.

Richard Britell

Richard Britell, a career painter, studied at Pratt Institute with Philip Pearlstein and Walter Erlebacher. His first show in NYC at Staempfli Gallery was sold out, and reviewed in the New York Times. Britell’s new works revolve around large, dreamy cityscapes tending toward abstraction. The artist currently lives in Pittsfield, MA.

Abby DuBow

Abby DuBow received her BA from Bennington College and her MA from the Bank Street School of Education. She has been a working artist her entire life and an art educator who taught at the Lenox, Fieldston, Brooklyn Friends, and Columbia Grammar and Prep Schools for over 30 years. She has continued to pursue her own art education at such diverse venues as Atelier 17 in Paris, the Art Students League, the Brooklyn Museum, Parsons School of Design, Great River Arts Institute and the Contemporary Art Center. She has studied painting, drawing, and printmaking with a variety of instructors including Stanley William Hayter, Paul Feeley, Tony Smith, Edith Katz, Rueben Tam, Seong Moy, Joe Stapleton, John Hultberg, Janis Loeb, Catherine Farish, and Sarah Amos. Her work has been exhibited in galleries throughout the country and is in many private collections. She has received many awards for creativity and excellence.

David Eddy

David Eddy is a self taught artist living and working in New Lebanon, NY. A fiercely independent soul who has long been connected to the freelance sports of surfing and skateboarding, It’s no wonder his artwork has a raw and passionate persona. His acrylic paintings are honest and emotional like a child’s, but are sophisticated, manipulated imperceptibly by the hand of a true artist. The “naive” characters within the paintings speak to the viewer as emotional self portraits. The New York Times described Eddy’s paintings as “noticeably reminiscent of Paul Klee’s”.

Julio Granda

Artist Julio Granda was born in New York City and spent his high
school years in Tampa, Florida. He joined the U.S. Navy in 1950, serving
two tours of duty in Korea. He received his art training at the School
of Visual Arts and Cooper Union in New York City, and his MFA at the
University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

Julio Granda has been painting in the Berkshires close to fifty
years, since moving from New York City, where he was a successful art
director and book cover designer. He settled in the town of Washington,
MA, and later moved to Pittsfield, MA. Currently, Julio paints in his
studio at the Lichtenstein Center for the Arts in Pittsfield.

Julio was a fine arts faculty member at Berkshire Community College
for seventeen years, becoming department chair during his tenure
there. In 1983 he was appointed by Governor Dukakis to serve on the
Massachusetts Council for the Arts and was a charter member of the
newly-formed Massachusetts Arts Lottery Council.  He has exhibited both
nationally and regionally and has work in many private collections as
well as in public collections such as those of Brown University, Smith
College, Yale University and the Chapin Library at Williams College.

His Illuminated Broadsides are in the rare or fine print collections of libraries and museums as well as in private collections throughout the United States. Among the poets and translators with whom he has collaborated or whose work he has illuminated are Martin Espada, Frederico Garcia Lorca, W.S. Merwin, Paul Metcalf/Herman Melville, Pablo Neruda, Ranier Maria Rilke, Richard Wilbur, Grace Paley and Lawrence Ferlinghetti.

Trish Hurley

As a child, crayons were my love…using colors rich and vibrant, deep and dark.  Now as an adult, each color evokes an emotion within me that I portray through my work.  Each piece of art that I create has a special ambience.  In creating monoprints, it’s a little more fun and serendipitous whereas painting is a more direct and controlled process often done with just palette knife and my fingers.  There’s a lot of thought, exaggeration, and excitement as part of the process of my art making.

The evolution of my artwork comes from a fascination of the outdoors,
whether it’s walking down a wooded path, a city street or sitting long a
river.  From there I take my attraction to abstract shapes of colors-
lights and darks and execute my palette knife visual studies rather
quickly, trying to capture the moment by mimicking the scene and
transpiring the sensual qualities of sound and temperature.  After
bringing these paintings inside to the studio, another painting,
generally a more abstract, larger painting is born more loose and
freeing.

Trish Hurley received her BFA in Painting from Swain School of Design and her MFA in Painting from the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth.
As a native New Englander, she now resides in Newport, R.I. and instructs at Community College of Rhode Island and the Westport Art Group in Westport MA, as well as privately.

Leslie Klein

Leslie Klein is a clay artist and sculptor, whose work has been shown in juried exhibitions, as well as, commissioned and collected by various organizations and private clients.
She created the sculpture for The Boston Freedom Award, presented by Coretta Scott King and Boston Mayor Thomas Menino, to Dr. Charles Jacobs, Founder of the American Anti-Slavery Group.
Her contemporary artifacts express the ancient quality of clay: often created for ceremony, ritual and in tribute to nature.
She teaches the art of clay to elders, children and special needs students at her Clay Forms Studio, and is a faculty artist for Community Access to the Arts.
Her op-ed, feature articles, and poetry have been published in various newspapers and magazines.

Douglass Truth

Truth was born in 1953 in Indianapolis, Indiana, into a family famous
for its lawyers. Attempts at remedial education throughout the years
have met with uncertain results, leaving him with a reputation as mixed
as his media.

He has worked as a civil engineering designer and surveyor during the
pipeline years in Alaska, as a dishwasher, a waiter, a chef, a building
dismantler, an English teacher, and as a software salesman in Taiwan.
He once owned and operated a graphic design and silkscreen company
called Flying Turtle Graphics. After a serious illness, Truth closed his
T-shirt business in order to devote himself entirely to painting and
writing, and as an artist has been represented by galleries from
California to New York with many places in between.

Truth has written and published three books. “I Am a Dog”, “Revolution of Flowers”, and “Everything I Know About Death (Subject to Verification)” — all of which will be available for sale at the gallery during his exhibition.
“In my paintings, writings and performances,” he says, “The harlequin, the clown, the watchers, giant stone heads, the flower people and the black dogs show up to point out, in ways difficult or impossible to articulate or modulate in our normal signaling fashion, from which directions we might be coming from, and what choices we might have going forward. I certainly believe in otherworlds, underworlds, multiworlds, and so on, but I also think we’re there now and have never been anywhere else. Our vision lapses into a routine. The real mystery — one of them, at least! —is what’s really going on all the time all around us. Here in a gallery, in the corner grocery store, our kitchen, our places of work, the cities and towns and countrysides in which we somehow, miraculously, find ourselves living right now. It’s all alive and it never ceases to speak to us.”

Terry Wise

Terry Wise was born in upstate New York in 1953 into a family transplanted from the midwest. Creative endeavors were always encouraged, and from an early age, she felt she would be an artist. This was profoundly confirmed while on a high school art class field trip to New York City, when she found herself surrounded by Georgia O’Keeffe paintings at a retrospective exhibit, Sky Above the Clouds, filling an entire gallery wall. She spent a year in the Netherlands as an exchange student, then began studying art at Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana,
graduating in 1976 with a BFA in Textile Design.

Being raised in a suburban household in the 1960s had firmly planted in her two deep, and often conflicting, imperatives: to pursue a professional career and to raise a family. For the past two plus decades, she has dedicated herself to maintaining
a nurturing household and raising three children, while always endeavoring to keep the love and the practice of art alive. This took many forms over the years: surface design and tapestry weaving, graphic and liturgical design, children’s fashions and
printmaking studies in the early 90s. In the mid-90s she began to study oil painting in the studio of painter Joan Griswold in Great Barrington, MA. Class work included several painting trips to Italy and Ireland. Terry currently maintains a studio in
Great Barrington and exhibits widely in solo and group shows and open studios.

The long and winding road has brought many elements into her current work. She gravitates toward still life subject matter as a format for experimentation in composition, color and texture. Repeated prints and richly colored textures have increasingly found their way into her work and bring it full circle to her textile
design training and passion for beautiful fabrics.

Lauren Clark Fine Art presents “True Dreams”, new paintings and a new performance piece by artist, writer, and performer, Douglass Truth. The art show opens with a reception for the artist, Saturday, October 12 from 4-7pm. The show will run through Sunday, November 3. The artist will hold a painting demonstration (a wonderful kind of performance in itself) on Sunday, November 3 from 1pm to 3pm. As he shares his painting techniques, so he shares much of himself along the way. This event is free and open to the public.

Lauren Clark has been representing Douglass Truth off and on since 2002. His most recent collaboration with the gallery was in 2016 when he participated in a show including two other Berkshire artists, David Eddy, and Julio Granda, in a show titled “Color Envy”. At that time, Truth performed his one man show “An Intimate Evening with Death, Herself” which has been performed coast to coast since 1995 with over 100 performances. Recently re-relocated, Truth now lives, paints, writes and performs in The Berkshires.

Of his recent work Truth says this, “My paintings are of a world, a world that I dream up when I have a brush in my hand. I must insist that in some sense those worlds—the worlds in the paintings—are as real as the one in which you seem to be reading these words. In fact these seemingly different worlds may be just different stops on the spectrum of reality, none more real than any other.
I seem to be somewhere, of that I can be completely sure.”

Truth references Donald Hoffman, a cognitive neuroscientist with an interesting theory. Hoffman says the things we think we see around us and interact with are projections of our consciousness. But he goes further than most to assert that time and space themselves, the very ground—we suppose—of our existence are not fundamental, but are also a projection of consciousness. That we, as conscious entities, are not at play in the quantum fields of SpaceTime, but that SpaceTime itself is a kind of dream that we make up.

“I find this exhilarating for some reason. It reminds me that the Buddhists say that what we experience as human beings is in the nature of a dream. But it always seems so solid and real, we think. How could it be? Just a dream?”

And for further enjoyment, please join us for two theatrical performances and a painting demonstration during the course of the show. Douglass Truth will perform his one man show, “True Dreams”, Thursday, October 17 and Friday, October 18 at 7:30pm. Order tickets here:  https://www.eventbrite.com/e/true-dreams-with-douglass-truth-tickets-74625090655

Consider the premise-“If Scheherazade were a frog trying to cross a river and there was a guy who makes friends with an ant that has a bent for philosophy who then told a story—the ant, that is—about a frozen Halibut, but it might have all been a dream that some random dude has, but you’ll never convince the ant, or the scorpion, for that matter, that it wasn’t all completely real. If an animal speaks, that means it’s a True Dream”.

The artist will hold a painting demonstration (a wonderful kind of performance in itself) on Sunday, November 3, from 1pm to 3pm. As he shares his painting techniques, so he shares much of himself along the way. This event is free and open to the public.

Truth was born in 1953 in Indianapolis, Indiana, into a family famous for its lawyers. Attempts at remedial education throughout the years have met with uncertain results, leaving him with a reputation as mixed as his media.

He has worked as a civil engineering designer and surveyor during the pipeline years in Alaska, as a dishwasher, a waiter, a chef, a building dismantler, an English teacher, and as a software salesman in Taiwan. He once owned and operated a graphic design and silkscreen company called Flying Turtle Graphics. After a serious illness, Truth closed his T-shirt business in order to devote himself entirely to painting and writing, and as an artist has been represented by galleries from California to New York with many places in between.

Truth has written and published three books. “I Am a Dog”, “Revolution of Flowers”, and “Everything I Know About Death (Subject to Verification)” — all of which will be available for sale at the gallery during his exhibition.
“In my paintings, writings and performances,” he says, “The harlequin, the clown, the watchers, giant stone heads, the flower people and the black dogs show up to point out, in ways difficult or impossible to articulate or modulate in our normal signaling fashion, from which directions we might be coming from, and what choices we might have going forward. I certainly believe in otherworlds, underworlds, multiworlds, and so on, but I also think we’re there now and have never been anywhere else. Our vision lapses into a routine. The real mystery — one of them, at least! —is what’s really going on all the time all around us. Here in a gallery, in the corner grocery store, our kitchen, our places of work, the cities and towns and countrysides in which we somehow, miraculously, find ourselves living right now. It’s all alive and it never ceases to speak to us.”

Bart Arnold, “Landmass”, acrylic on paper, 11″ x 11″

Lauren Clark Fine Art presents “TOPOGRAPHIES and other abstractions”, new work by Bart Arnold, July 13 through July 27, 2019.  There will be a reception for the artist, Saturday, July 13, from 5-7pm.

Bart Arnold is perhaps best known as a designer and maker of hand forged sterling silver and gold jewelry, or as the creator of his “Constructions”, three dimensional, painted wall sculptures in which he combines clean lines with complex textures, colors, and/or patinas. 

He established his style as a non-objective painter while living in New York and working toward his MFA at NYU and has been developing it for the past four decades.  Currently, Bart has combined his rich painting style into two dimensional artworks on paper and canvas.  In this show, Lauren Clark will present a recently completed series of this work.

A few words from the artist, “As a non-objective painter my “subject matter” has always been the interplay of color, form, and texture. Visual inspiration comes from the natural world, the cultural environment, and the trends of art history, as I focus on the abstract qualities of what I encounter.

Recently I have been interested in the abstract elements of maps: satellite views, roadmaps, terrains, elevations, etc., and the arbitrary shapes created by geographic and political boundaries. My current work reflects this influence by layering invented shapes and painterly maneuvers within an implied map-like framework.”

Bart’s work has been exhibited in galleries in the Los Angeles area where he lived for several years as well as others from Houston to Munich.  Locally, he has shown at Simon’s Rock,  Five Points Gallery, Spazi Contemporary Art, Tokonoma Gallery and the Shade Gallery in Lenox among others.  He has been represented by Lauren Clark since 2010 beginning with his jewelry collection. In addition to a solo show with her in 2011, he has participated in several group shows in the gallery.

Lauren Clark Fine Art is located at 684 Main Street Great Barrington, MA. Business hours are Thursday through Monday from 11:00 until 5:30 and Sunday from 11:00 until 4:00. For more information call 413.528.0432.

Please join us for the group show, “The Last Waltz”, with gallery artists Joby Baker, Richard Britell, Julio Granda, Geoffrey Moss, Franco Pellegrino, Joe Wheaton and Terry Wise, opening Saturday, November 10, 2018, with a reception for the artists from 4-7pm.

This will be the last show curated and hosted by Lauren Clark at her eponymous gallery at 325 Stockbridge Road in Great Barrington, MA, and featuring her top tier artists.

Some work will be new and previously unseen, some might be well aged but as relevant as ever. Undoubtedly it will all be of interest, and the reason you’ve been visiting year after year to see, to discuss, to collect.

The gallery and framing business will be moving to 684 Main Street, Great Barrington, January 1, 2019. Until then we will continue to operate as usual.  Also, all the pottery and glass is and will continue to be on sale during this time.  Come see me!

 

Please join us for a Book Launch & Reading of Belle Fox-Martin’s new collection of poetry and micro fiction:
“Stone Pears”
Friday, October 19, 2018, 6pm.

This is yet another smart and engaging collection of Belle’s poetry and prose.  Belle Fox Martin writes as witness to a wide sweep of themes, embracing old love, peace, nature, solitude, revenge, aging and even fantasy. Some prose pieces are like linear conversations, charming in their own right. The poetry is very different from the prose pieces; more abstract, metaphorical and often playful. All in all, her writing teeters on the literary cusp between Samuel Beckett and David Sedaris.

This is Belle Fox-Martin’s sixth book to date and it most certainly reflects her eclectic experiences as a Congregational Minister, artist, social worker, and writing teacher. She lives in Glendale, MA with her wife, Cheryl Hutto, and their one poodle and two little sibling somewhat rodent looking dogs who you might speculate were found roaming the streets of Cuba.

Friday, October 19 at 6pm.  Join us for a little cheer!

Jim Youngerman, “New Work: Strange & Alluring” set to open Saturday, August 4, with a reception for the artist from 4-7pm.  The show runs through August 26.

Known locally and nationally as a fine artist working primarily in watercolor, ink and graphite on paper, Mr. Youngerman’s work has been recognized as brilliant, lyrical, surreal and often humorous.  His work is deep yet whimsical and employs visual commentary on everything from politics to the environment and to our relationship to the animal kingdom.

Included in the show are two unusual collaborations with the artist.  The first is a series of collaborative prints which were developed by Jim and poet David Keplinger. Over the period of a year the two exchanged art and words to create this unique body of work.

The experience was unique for both; an unprecedented process of give and take.  It all started in September of 2015 when Jim noticed the boots Davey was wearing and snapped a photo thinking he could see a poem in the boots.  Jim started the process by presenting David with 12 drawn images.

At this point, David wrote poems in response to them and in some cases, removing sections of the images and inserting the poems.  In response to that, Jim then selected specific lines from the poems, merging them with the images. In one piece, David wrote a poem which included flying birds, which Jim later added to the composition.  The process continued back and forth, as both finely tuned the balance of image and written word, resulting in twelve giclée prints.

The second, less a collaboration and more of a spontaneous interpretive inspiration by Berkshire musician Johnny Irion, is based on a particular artwork by Jim, making for a wonderful visual and aural experience.

Mr. Youngerman has participated in over 60 art shows locally, nationally and internationally from the 1970’s to the present, and is in many prominent collections.  Well known in the theater world, Mr. Youngerman is also an award winning stage and set designer.  Having worked with Shakespeare & Co. for 10 years, this summer he is designing the sets for is “As You Like It” in the Roman Garden Theater.

On August 11 from 2-3:30pm, David Keplinger will be reading from his latest collection of poetry along with a discussion and talk back with Jim about their collaboration.

A few words from the artist:

“I make these works on paper one step at a time; never having
a preconceived idea of where things will go. This stream of
consciousness approach produces compositions with
juxtapositions of people, places and objects, which often exist
within ambiguous timeframes.

I use simple lines in a lyrical, figurative, quasi cartoon style to
paradoxically get at something a bit deeper. I juxtapose people
and animals in perplexing situations; in doing so, I attempt to
explore dualities and commonalities.  I never draw conclusions
but prefer to pose questions.

My painting has evolved over the years, while always working
on paper. I have always used medium to achieve
my ends, not to try to find meaning within the medium.  It’s not
about letting the paint speak or trying to find meaning in the
graphite itself, rather, it’s about using various techniques to
reinforce and illuminate the narrative which I’m putting forth.”

Please join us for a reception for the artist Saturday, July 14, 4-7pm.

As an artist I deal with relationships. Relationships that I have to the world, community, environment, family, and friends. I also deal with the relationship I have with myself at any given time. My art, whether I’m painting, drawing, printing, or sculpting reflects these relationships. I use my environment and my observations in my work. It is therefore, inevitably, autobiographic.

I feel that my art is about life and its contradictions. I look for objects that talk to me and either use them as is, or transform them in my work. For me art is not an end but a constant beginning, a path that continues to lead to new places with doors that have to be opened. It is a process that creates joy, that demands hard work, and can be filled with both frustration as well as satisfaction.

I enjoy working with a wide variety of two and three-dimensional materials, which include oils, acrylics, pastels, inks, encaustics and a wide variety of, found objects. I am currently very focused on learning all the possibilities and techniques of etching on copper plates. I am working on combining the nuance and intricacy of etching with the spontaneity and variety of monotype and collograph. It allows me to draw, collage, and build up layers in the creation of one of a kind prints.

Art has its own voice and often takes me in unexpected directions. I like exploring the possibilities of accidents. It’s challenging and exciting to engage and work with the unexpected. Making art is a necessity for me. It aids me in sorting out and distilling the world around me. I do not replicate what I see, but rather reflect what I see and feel. For me, creating art is an emotional process. I cannot separate my feelings from my work. Yet I am always struggling to distill these feelings and find universal and concise ways of visualizing emotions.

Abby DuBow

June 2018